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09/26/2014 - A-29 Super Tucano arrives at Moody AFB

A-29 Super Tucano arrives at Moody AFB

by Staff Sgt. Eric Summers Jr.
23d Wing Public Affairs

MOODY AIR FORCE BASE, Ga. - The first of 20 A-29 Super Tucano aircraft arrived here Sept. 26, in preparation for the Afghanistan pilot and maintenance training mission.

The A-29 is a light air support training aircraft that will be used to train 30 Afghan pilots and 90 Afghan maintainers as part of a requirement from the International Security Assistance Force to conduct training outside of Afghanistan.

"This is a very unique program, it's a great opportunity and it's definitely a great day for Moody Air Force Base," said Lt. Col. Jeffrey Hogan, Afghan A-29 Light Air Support training unit commander. "This aircraft is perfect for the mission; it's going to be a great opportunity for us to interact with the Afghans. We will be teaching them, but we will be learning from them as well."

The need for the A-29 comes as the current Afghan Air Force LAS aircraft, the Mi-35 attack helicopter, reaches the end of its service life in January 2016.

"Specifically the mission that we are going to replace is the Mi-35 Helicopter, which is an attack helicopter, so they cover some of the same missions," Hogan said. "But really this aircraft is a monumental leap in capabilities for the Afghan Air Force. It will allow us to do some overlap of those [Mi-35] missions and will do a lot better; it will also expand some other missions, which they currently cannot execute.

During the unveiling ceremony held the day prior to the arrival, U.S. Air Force Maj. Gen. John McMullen, 9th Air and Space Expeditionary Task Force- Afghanistan commander Air, U.S. Forces-Afghanistan deputy commander, also spoke about Afghanistan's need for the aircraft.

"Clearly the biggest gap in the Afghan Air Force is the ability to deliver fire from the air to the enemy on the ground," McMullen said. "The missing piece that is vital to the [Afghan National Security Force] success is an air to ground platform that can drop precision weapons, that has the speed and the range to [reach] out to all of Afghanistan, and that platform is the A-29. It's the perfect aircraft for the terrain in Afghanistan, it's the perfect aircraft for the conflict in Afghanistan, and it's the perfect aircraft for the Afghanistan Air Force."

The United States frequently hosts aircraft training to international students from different countries such as Norway, Poland, Singapore, the Netherlands, and Iraq on the F-16. The U.S. also provides Afghan students flying training in other established programs at bases in Texas, Mississippi, Arkansas and Oklahoma. Eight of the 10 Afghan students in the first training class at Moody have previously earned their wings through U.S. Air Force pilot training.

"The Air Force trains international students, thousands of them, every day," Hogan said. "The pilots we are getting are just another product that we have produced over the years. We have the procedures and policies in place to ensure that the mission is executed safely. They are not new pilots; they are very experienced and we will always be flying in the aircraft with them."

Following the training, all 20 aircraft will be provided to the Afghan Air Force and will provide air-to-ground and aerial reconnaissance capabilities to support Afghanistan's counterinsurgency operations and airborne self-defense for their government and citizens.

"As General McMullen said, the Afghan Air Force very much needs the A-29," said Afghan Air Force Maj. Gen. Abdul Wahab Wardak, Afghan Air Force commander, during the A-29 unveiling ceremony in Jacksonville, Fla. "Right now we do not have any type of aircraft that can guard the troops and provide the support. Thank you to everyone that has worked this program. And our friendship will continue to grow and be strong into the future."

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09/26/2014 - First A-29 Delivered to USAF

First A-29 Delivered to USAF

9/26/2014


The first A-29 Super Tucano to be assigned to Moody AFB, Ga., was delivered to the Air Force during a roll out ceremony in Jacksonville, Fla., on Sept. 25, 2014. Embraer Defense and Security photo.

Sierra Nevada Corporation and Embraer Defense and Security delivered the first United States-built A-29 Super Tucano light air support aircraft to the US Air Force during a ceremony Thursday in Jacksonville, Fla., according to a company release. It is the first of 20 such aircraft that will eventually call Moody AFB, Ga., home. The base was named the US training location for the Afghan air force’s A-29 pilots and maintainers in late August. “The Super Tucano is a robust and powerful turboprop aircraft capable of carrying out a wide range of missions,” said Jackson Schneider, Embraer Defense and Security CEO and president. Jackson noted that over 10-plus years of operations the A-29 has proven “to be a cost-effective airpower solution for nations around the world.”

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09/25/2014 - Embraer rolls out first A-29 Super Tucano fighter plane; aircraft destined to bolster Afghan troops

Embraer rolls out first A-29 Super Tucano fighter plane; aircraft destined to bolster Afghan troops

By Clifford Davis Thu, Sep 25, 2014 @ 3:47 pm | updated Thu, Sep 25, 2014 @ 5:25 pm

Rep. Ander Crenshaw, R-Fla., left, speaks with others including Afghanistan Air Force Gen. Abdul Wahad at the unveiling of the first A-29 Super Tucano assembled at the Embraer facility in Jacksonville on Sept. 25, 2014.

The unveiling of the first A-29 Super Tucano fighter at Embraer’s Jacksonville facility Thursday represented hope for the Pentagon, Afghanistan and for Jacksonville.

The plane is the first of Embraer’s line to be produced at the Northside facility which, 18 months ago, was just an empty warehouse. Embraer won the $427 million contract for 20 light-air-support planes, trainers and technical support last February after a bitter struggle with Hawker Beechcraft.

Gary Spulack, president of Embraer Aircraft Holding Inc., said Jacksonville’s skilled workforce was a major factor in choosing the city for their facility. “That’s the core of the success of this whole thing, the skilled workforce,” Spulack said. “The success you see today indicates that was a good decision on our part.

“The skill available in the workforce was actually one of the things we evaluated during the site selection process.”

The Embraer facility, which is intended for more than this contract, now employs 137 employees and contractors, and Embraer has estimated that the facility will support 100 parts suppliers in 20 states for an additional 1,400 U.S. jobs.

The work Afghans will doing with the plane means even more.

With the impending pullout of American troops from Afghanistan at the end of 2016, both countries want to avoid a fall like that of South Vietnam where a U.S. trained and backed army quickly crumbled after U.S. troops left. The Tucano represents one part of the effort to prevent such a fate.

“The Super Tucano will play a vital role in terms of our national security by allowing the Afghans to have their own light air support, which is very important,” said U.S. Rep. Ander Crenshaw, R-Fla. “As you know, we’ve spent a lot of time, energy, blood, sweat and tears to help them become an independent nation.

“If they didn’t have this type of close-air support, it would make it very difficult for them to carry on the fight.”

The glistening new Tucano at first glance looks like a P-51 Mustang with its propellar and classic good looks. And it is an impressive aircraft with high-tech reconnaissance and weapons capabilities.

But will a propeller-driven aircraft with a cruising speed of 320 miles per hour last in fighting against a stubborn, if ill-equipped, enemy?

“This aircraft is specifically developed to be able to operate in a certain environment, an environment that fits the model of Afghanistan,” said Maj. Gen. Emmett Titshaw, a former fighter pilot and Florida adjutant general. “This particular platform just fits the bill perfectly for the type of environment they’re in which is a semi-permissable environment where there isn’t a sophisticated anti-aircraft system like you have in Syria.”

The need is definitely there.

The Afghan Air Force currently has only five Mi-35 helicopters for ground support. When U.S. forces leave Afghanistan, their air power leaves with them.

“The Afghan Air Force very much needs the A-29,” said Afghan Air Force Maj. Gen. Abdul Wahab. “Right now, we don’t have any air support that can guard our troops.”

Just how long the U.S. will have to keep providing such help remains the question.

After a contentious presidential election and ongoing offensives from the Taliban, there is little doubt that need will continue.

“The government and the Air Force of the United States has played a tremendous role in training, educating, equipping and building the Afghan force,” Wahab said. “I hope that partnership and cooperation continues in the future.

“The Afghan Air Force has progressed because of this assistance and the Afghan Air Force will continue to need strong support.”

Clifford Davis: (904) 359-4103

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09/25/2014 - 1st A-29 'Super Tucano' rolled out at Jacksonville plant
NEWS 4 -

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09/25/2014 - Embraer delivers first A-29 to US Air Force

Embraer delivers first A-29 to US Air Force


Miami (AFP) - Brazilian aviation firm Embraer said Thursday that it had delivered the first of 20 light-attack aircraft to the US Air Force, for use in Afghanistan after the NATO troop withdrawal.

The A-29 Super Tucano was presented at a ceremony in Jacksonville, Florida where Embraer and its US-based partner Sierra Nevada Corporation are building the aircraft.

The $427 million contract to build the 20 Super Tucanos, a turboprop craft for light missions and pilot training, was announced in February 2013.

The awarding of the contract to Embraer provoked a challenge early on from US aviation firm Beechcraft, which alleged irregularities in the bidding process.

"The Super Tucano is a robust and powerful turboprop aircraft capable of carrying out a wide range of missions and, in more than 10 years of operations, it has confirmed to be a cost-effective airpower solution for nations around the world," said Jackson Schneider, president and CEO of Embraer's defense division.

The A-29 is currently in use by nine countries in Latin America, Africa and Asia, according to Embraer, which said it had delivered 170 of the 210 ordered so far.

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09/25/2014 - Embraer rolls out first US-assembled Super Tucano

Embraer rolls out first US-assembled Super Tucano

25 SEPTEMBER, 2014 | BY: DAN PARSONS | WASHINGTON DC

Embraer North America and Sierra Nevada Corp (SNC) on 25 September rolled out the first A-29 Super Tucano light attack aircraft produced outside Brazil.

The aircraft is the first of 20 produced for the US Air Force under the light air support (LAS) programme designed to provide allied nations with a counter-insurgency fighter.

Embraer’s North American manufacturing presence previously was limited to the business jet market. The Super Tucano rollout makes official the entry of its US division into the defence manufacturing market, says Gary Spulak, president of Embraer Aircraft Holding. Embraer assembles the Phenom 100 and 300 business jets at its Melbourne, Florida facility and has plans to expand production there to include lines for both the Legacy 450 and 500 jets.


The company’s Jacksonville, Florida, facility was merely an empty hangar 18 months ago. It now employs around 120 full-time and contract workers. Aside from the first completed Super Tucano, six others are in various stages of production at the facility. The aircraft already has achieved its US military type certification.

“We’re anxious to get it out flying,” says Taco Gilbert, vice-president of integrated tactical solutions for SNC's intelligence surveillance and reconnaissance business area. The first A-29 will depart on 26 September to begin training missions with USAF pilots and maintainers, who will then train their Afghan counterparts at US bases.

Under the LAS programme, the USAF pays for the aircraft to be delivered and provides the partner country – in this case Afghanistan ‑ with training and access to sensors and weapons.

The Sierra Nevada/Embraer team and the Beechcraft AT-6 were the only bidders for the LAS contract. SNC and Embraer twice won the award despite a formal protest from Beechcraft that was denied by the US Government Accountability Office.

The $427 million contract is for 20 aircraft that will be delivered to the USAF and then to Afghan security forces. The contract includes the Embraer aircraft and ground training devices, spare parts, flight simulators contract logistics support provided by SNC, which is the prime contractor for the programme.

“This aircraft is uniquely capable to support the light air support mission and defend the people of Afghanistan against the terrorists and insurgents that they face every day,” Gilbert said.

The company is already in talks with other nations about future sales through the US foreign military sales process, Gilbert says. Embraer has built 170 A-29s for nine air forces that have a combined 28,000 flight hours.

In partnering with Embraer, SNC evaluated the future growth capacity of the A-29 to accept new sensor and weapon technologies that could allow expand mission capabilities, Gilbert says.

“The platform has demonstrated its ability to evolve and accept new missions, new sensors,” he says.

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09/25/2014 - Embraer rolls out first US-assembled Super Tucano

First Super Tucano Accepted Into U.S. Air Force

Amy Butler | AWIN First


After years of bitter competitions, Embraer has finally established a U.S. foothold for production of defense systems stateside with the rollout of its first A-29 Super Tucano for sale to the U.S. Air Force.

Embraer is teamed with Sierra Nevada Corp. to deliver 20 Super Tucanos to the service, which will then transfer them to Afghan forces. The team is also training U.S. instructor pilots and maintainers, who will provide training to Afghan forces. Training in Afghanistan is slated for early next year.

This was the company’s first successful venture into the U.S. defense market. Embraer previously won a contract with Lockheed Martin to supply ERJ 145s for intelligence aircraft; the deal cratered once it became evident the platforms were too small to contain the equipment required for the service.

The company was also the winner of a 2011 competition with the Super Tucano for what the Air Force calls the Light Air Support (LAS) program. However, rival Beechcraft protested, having been dismissed from the competition, and the service ultimately conducted another duel. Sierra Nevada and Embraer again won and, after yet another protest, the team was pronounced the victor.

Embraer has dedicated a facility in Jacksonville, Florida, to the Super Tucano final assembly work for the U.S. Air Force; work will also continue on its line in Brazil for other customers.

"It is a natural thing to incorporate that into the Jacksonville operation," said Gary Spulak, president of Embraer Aircraft Holding Inc. Parts for the A-29 are supplied by more than 100 companies in 21 states and "instead of shipping U.S. parts to Brazil for assembly, they ship to Florida" now for the U.S. aircraft, says Taco Gilbert, vice president of Sierra Nevada’s tactical intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance business.

The deal for $427.5 million – covering 20 aircraft as well as training, support and spares – was anticipated to be the first tranche of work. However, amid constant protests from Beechcraft and declining budgets, the Air Force has not opted for a second buy. But team officials expect the Afghan forces to buy the systems in the future.

They say there is a global market as high as $3.5 billion that could be tapped for less wealthy nations seeking simple armed support for border protection as well as wealthy nations – such as the U.S. – in need of an inexpensive complement to its costly F-35s and F-22s.

This is a pitch also being made by Textron AirLand, with its newly designed Scorpion, a twin-engine jet aircraft aimed at the light-attack and fast-jet trainer market. Gilbert said the A-29’s historical operating cost is $1,000 per hour; Scorpion’s is advertised at $3,000.

Embraer’s plant opened in February, and the first A-29 has already been accepted by the Air Force. Eight aircraft are on the line in various stages of final assembly, Spulak said. The final aircraft is slated for delivery in the summer of 2015.

The initial deliveries were slated for late 2013, but slipped due to the Beechcraft protest. Each aircraft requires up to 80 days in final assembly, Gilbert says.

Meanwhile, Spulak and Gilbert are optimistic that foreign sales will emerge. They declined to discuss interested parties due to customer privacy concerns. Because the Brazilian assembly line is continuing work, a lull in activity in Florida will not cause an interruption in the supply chain, Spulak says.

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09/25/2014 - Embraer, Sierra Nevada Roll Out U.S.-assembled A-29

Embraer, Sierra Nevada Roll Out U.S.-assembled A-29

by Bill Carey

Embraer and Sierra Nevada Corporation (SNC) on September 25 rolled out the first American-assembled A-29 Super Tucano for the U.S. Air Force’s Light Air Support (LAS) program. The single-engine turboprop will be used to provide light air support, reconnaissance and training capabilities to the Afghanistan military.

The Air Force awarded Embraer and U.S. partner SNC a $427 million contract to supply 20 Super Tucanos, ground-based training devices, pilot and maintenance training and logistical support in February 2013. Losing contractor Beechcraft twice protested the contract award, which the service first made to Embraer and SNC in December 2011.

Embraer Defense and Security opened a 40,000-sq-ft hangar facility at Jacksonville International Airport in Florida to assemble A-29s manufactured in Brazil. The facility performs pre-equipping, mechanical assembly, structural assembly, systems installation and testing and flight testing. Embraer said it has hired 72 employees thus far.

At the roll-out ceremony in Jacksonville, Air Force Brig. Gen. Eric Fick said air advisor training for the LAS program will be conducted at Moody Air Force Base near Valdosta, Ga.

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09/25/2014 - Jacksonville-built Super Tucano — first made in U.S. — rolls off the line

Jacksonville-built Super Tucano — first made in U.S. — rolls off the line

Jensen Werley

The first A29 Super Tucano manufactured in the United States made its debut today in a ceremony at the Embraer facility at Jacksonville International Airport.

The light air support defense plane, contracted by the U.S. Air Force from Sierra Nevada Corp. and built by Brazilian-based Embraer, has passed its military certifications and was officially approved for use by the Air Force. The Afghan National Army will eventually use the plane for light air support.

"The capability speaks for itself," said Taco Gilbert, vice president of the Sierra Nevada Corp. "It's gotten its air worthiness approval, which is a stamp of approval from the U.S. Air Force."

As the first Super Tucano built in the United States, this plane is one of 20 ordered in the original Air Force contract for $427 million. Gilbert said he felt confident there could be additional orders, and said the group was in contact with other potential customers.

There are eight planes in various stages of production, said Dan Culleton, general manager for Embraer. Each plane spends about 15 days in each segment of production, which are broken down into further stages. Planes go through pre-equipping and pre-assembly, final assembly and flight operations assessments before being presented to the customer.

About 137 employees were hired from the area for these construction projects, Culleton said. Employees range from technicians to support labor to production engineers to logistics specialists.

"Jacksonville is blessed with aviation skills," he said.

Gary Spulak, president of Embraer Aircraft Holding Inc., said the core of the project's success has been Jacksonville's workforce, which was a main driver for selecting the city as the site for its construction.

"It's a win-win," he said. "A win for the community, a win for us and a win for the air fighter."

Mayor Alvin Brown, who was in attendance, praised the success of the facility and Embraer's public-private partnership with the city.

"It's about creating economic security," he said, "and that's happening right here in Jacksonville… . This achievement is a testament to Jacksonville's stature as the most military-friendly city in America."

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09/25/2014 - Airplane assembly brings jobs to Jacksonville

Airplane assembly brings jobs to Jacksonville

By Anneliese Delgado

Jacksonville, Fl. —What started out as an empty hanger on the Northside less than two years ago is now the place where military airplanes are assembled.

The first completed A-29 Super Tucano was showcased near the Jacksonville International Airport Thursday morning.

More than 120 Embraer Defense and Security employees worked to assemble the aircraft. A spokesperson for Embraer said most of those employees are veterans.

“This is more about just building planes,” Mayor Alvin Brown said. “This is about economic development.”

The U.S. government signed a contract with the Sierra Nevada Corporation and Embraer to ensure 20 Super Tucano aircrafts will be made in the upcoming months, according to an Embraer spokesperson. The contract is worth $427 million.

The planes will be assembled at a facility near Airport Road then will be used to help the Afghan Air Force.

“This airplane will provide the kind of close air support that’s very critical in the kind of fighting that’s going on in Afghanistan,” said Congressman Ander Crenshaw.

The Afghan Air Force lacks aircrafts that are able to fire from the air to the ground, according to one military speaker.

WOKV was able to tour the facility where the Super Tucano planes are assembled. A spokesperson for Embraer said it takes about five months to assemble one plane. Eight planes are assembled at one time in the facility.

The basic skeleton of the planes are made in Brazil then shipped to Jacksonville.

Embraer hopes to continue making the Super Tucano models for other companies once the contract with the U.S. government is fulfilled.

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09/25/2014 - Fighter plane being built on First Coast debuts

Fighter plane being built on First Coast debuts

By Andrew Capasso

JACKSONVILLE, Fla. -- More than 100 contractors and engineers are working at a facility on the city's Northside to build 20 A-29 Super Tucano fighter planes.

The planes will be used by the Afghan Air Force in their fight against insurgents.

"It's an important responsibility," said Gary Spulak, president of Embraer Aircraft Holding, Inc.. That's the company that won the $427 million contract to produce the planes.

Many of the workers building the planes have military experience.

"That's the key, that's the core of this whole thing, the skilled workforce," Spulak said.

It's expected that 20 of the planes will be completed by next June. At the Embraer hangar, eight planes can be worked on at the same time. It takes about five months to finish one plane.


Major General Abdul Wahab, Commander of the Afghan Air Force, gets inside the A-29 Super Tucano (Photo: Andrew Capasso)

"It's the perfect airplane for the battles being fought in Afghanistan," said Congressman Ander Crenshaw.

The A-29 Super Tucano will give the Afghan Air Force the ability to use weapons from the air. Rep. Crenshaw says that's something not readily available, and something that's desperately needed.

"This is very critical for Afghanistan as it stands up as a free and open democracy," he said.

One the planes are built, they'll go to the Moody Air Force Base so pilots can train on them. After that, they'll go to Afghanistan.


The A-29 Super Tucano makes it's debut at a hanger near JIA. (Photo: Andrew Capasso)


A-29 Super Tucano Debut (Photo: Andrew Capasso)

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09/25/2014 - Embraer entrega primer avión a Fuerza Aérea de EU

Embraer entrega primer avión a Fuerza Aérea de EU

La compañía brasileña Embraer informó la entrega del primero de los 27 aviones A-29 Super Tucano que fueron adquiridos por la Fuerza Aérea de los Estados Unidos.

La compañía brasileña Embraer informó que entregó este jueves el primero de los veinte aviones A-29 Super Tucano que le compró la Fuerza Aérea estadounidense, para usarlos en Afganistán tras el retiro de las tropas de la OTAN.

El aparato fue entregado en una ceremonia en Jacksonville, Florida (sureste de EEUU), donde son construidas las aeronaves entre Embraer Defensa y Seguridad y la estadounidense Sierra Nevada Corporation, indicó un comunicado.

La venta de los veinte Super Tucano, un avión turbo-hélice para misiones ligeras y entrenamiento de pilotos, fue anunciada en febrero de 2013, por un monto de 427 millones de dólares.

La ceremonia contó con representantes del gobierno de Barack Obama y de las empresas involucradas.

Este avión "puede realizar un gran variedad de misiones y, en más de diez años de operaciones, se ha consolidado como una solución aérea rentable para las naciones en el mundo", dijo el presidente de Embraer Defensa y Seguridad, Jackson Schneider.

"Esperamos entregar según el calendario y dentro del presupuesto estos importantes recursos para Afganistán en lo sucesivo para garantizar tanto el éxito del retiro de las tropas estadounidenses como la seguridad de toda la región", señaló de su lado el presidente de Sierra Nevada Corporation, Fatih Ozmen.

El contrato firmado con el consorcio Embraer-Sierra Nevada generó protestas de la empresa estadounidense Beechraft, quien ya había conseguido ante la justicia que fuera anulada una primera licitación del 2011 alegando supuestas irregularidades en el proceso.

El AT-29 Super Tucano está diseñado para ataques ligeros, contrainsurgencia, apoyo aéreo cercano, misiones de reconocimiento aéreo en ambientes de bajas amenazas y entrenamiento.

Actualmente es usado por las fuerzas aéreas de nueve países en América Latina, Africa y Asia, según Embraer, quien indicó haber entregado hasta ahora 170 aeronaves de las 210 que le fueron pedidas.

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09/15/2014 - Embraer delivers first A-29 to US Air Force

Embraer delivers first A-29 to US Air Force

Agence France-Presse on Sep 25, 2014 @ 6:00 PM

Brazilian aviation firm Embraer said Thursday that it had delivered the first of 20 light-attack aircraft to the US Air Force, for use in Afghanistan after the NATO troop withdrawal.

The A-29 Super Tucano was presented at a ceremony in Jacksonville, Florida where Embraer and its US-based partner Sierra Nevada Corporation are building the aircraft.

The $427 million contract to build the 20 Super Tucanos, a turboprop craft for light missions and pilot training, was announced in February 2013.

The awarding of the contract to Embraer provoked a challenge early on from US aviation firm Beechcraft, which alleged irregularities in the bidding process.

"The Super Tucano is a robust and powerful turboprop aircraft capable of carrying out a wide range of missions and, in more than 10 years of operations, it has confirmed to be a cost-effective airpower solution for nations around the world," said Jackson Schneider, president and CEO of Embraer's defense division.

The A-29 is currently in use by nine countries in Latin America, Africa and Asia, according to Embraer, which said it had delivered 170 of the 210 ordered so far.

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08/22/2014 - Moody AFB to support Afghan pilot, maintainer training mission

Moody AFB to support Afghan pilot, maintainer training mission

MOODY AIR FORCE BASE, Ga. (AFNS) -- The Air Force recently completed its environmental analysis and has selected Moody Air Force Base here as the stateside training location for Afghan A-29 pilots and maintainers.

The base was announced as the preferred alternative in June following site surveys at three candidate bases: Mountain Home AFB, Idaho; Moody AFB, Ga.; and Shaw AFB, S.C.

Completion of the environmental analysis marks the final step of the Air Force's formal basing process to determine the most suitable location for the contingent of A-29 aircraft and the associated instructors and students.

"Moody AFB was selected because of the availability of the airfield, airspace and suitable facilities. Additionally, the overall cost to complete the beddown in the timeframe required to initiate the training program made Moody the best choice," said Timothy K. Bridges, the deputy assistant secretary of the Air Force for installations.

Moody AFB will support 20 A-29 aircraft, 17 Air Force instructor pilots, and 24 maintenance and support personnel to train a total of 30 Afghan pilots and 90 Afghan maintainers over the next four years. Under current plans, the aircraft may arrive at Moody AFB as early as September 2014 and the first Afghan trainees are expected to begin training in February 2015. The initial proposed commitment for this training mission entails a limited presence at the base from 2014 into 2018.

"Moody AFB is honored to host the Afghan A-29 flying training mission beginning later this year. We look forward to supporting this important mission that will continue to develop the capabilities of the Afghanistan Air Force," said Col. Chad Franks, the 23rd Wing commander.

Department of Defense officials have determined that a stateside training option is the most feasible option to deliver capability to the Afghan air force. All 20 aircraft are to be provided to the Afghan air force following this training.

The A-29 is a multi-role, fixed-wing aircraft that will provide the Afghan air force with an indigenous air-to-ground capability and aerial reconnaissance capabilities to support the country's counterinsurgency operations. The Department of the Air Force is purchasing these aircraft for the Afghan forces on behalf of Combined Security Transition Command-Afghanistan using DOD's Afghanistan Security Forces Fund appropriation.

Provision of the A-29 Light Air Support program will increase the Afghan air force's capacity in airborne self-defense for their government and citizens.

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03/26/2013 - Jacksonville International Airport raises unofficial curtain on military aircraft factory

Jacksonville International Airport raises unofficial curtain on military aircraft factory

Posted: March 26, 2013 - 3:27pm
By Drew Dixon

With legal fights lingering and budget battles waging in the nation’s capital, Jacksonville International Airport entered the military aircraft manufacturing business on Tuesday.

Gov. Rick Scott was on hand at the site where Sierra Nevada Corp. and its Brazilian subcontractor, Embraer Aircraft Holding, will assemble at least 20 of the single-engine A-29 Super Tucano light air support planes. The aircraft eventually will be shipped to Afghanistan to help fight enemies of the government there.

Although the official opening was Tuesday, the 41,000-sqaure-foot facility at JIA and its 50 employees won’t actually be building the aircraft until near the end of this year.

Read more at Jacksonville.com.

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03/08/2013 - Delayed Landing: Embraer Persistence Pays Off for Jacksonville

Delayed Landing: Embraer Persistence Pays Off for Jacksonville

by Carole Hawkins
Jacksonville Business Journal

JACKSONVILLE — Brazilian plane maker Embraer stuck with plans to assemble military aircraft at Jacksonville International Airport for more than a year. In doing so, the company outlasted one lawsuit between a competitor and the government, two U.S. Department of Defense application processes and three expired options to lease a JIA hangar.

The Department of Defense on Feb. 27 awarded, for a second time, a $427 million contract to Embraer and Sierra Nevada Corp. of Sparks, Nev., its general contractor, to supply 20 Super Tucano light air support planes. The aircraft will help the U.S. to withdraw from Afghanistan by providing the Afghan army with the weapons and technology it needs to fight Taliban insurgents.

Who is Embraer and why was the company so determined to build planes in Jacksonville? According to one company executive, local business advantages drove its decision-making.

Embraer is the world’s third largest commercial aircraft manufacturer, according to the company’s website. The multinational firm produces three product lines: commercial aircraft up to 120 seats, private executive jets, and defense and security aircraft. Commercial airlines American Airlines and US Airways are among its customers. Anyone who has flown regularly on corporate jets six seats and larger has likely been on a plane built by Embraer.

The company wants to grow its defense and security division — projected at 19 percent of revenue this year, up from 13 percent last year. The Super Tucano award gives the company its first toehold in the prestigious U.S. defense industry.

Embraer has operated in the U.S. for 30 years of its 40-year history, and employs more than 1,200 in this country. Its U.S. headquarters is in Fort Lauderdale and Embraer has recently expanded in Florida.

In 2011 the company moved the headquarters of its executive jets division to Florida from Brazil and opened its first U.S. aircraft assembly facility and a global customer center for executive jets in Melbourne. The company plans to open an engineering and technology center in Melbourne as well.

Bob Stangarone, Embraer vice president of corporate communications for North America, said a U.S. presence has long been important to the company.

“Half the market for executive jets is in North America,” he said. “It brings our business closer to our customers and gives us a cleaner supply-chain.”

The company in 1979 picked Fort Lauderdale as its U.S. base because of Florida’s business-friendly environment and because it was easy to attract employees to the state’s beaches, sunny weather and high quality of life, Stangarone said.

NASA layoffs created another opportunity. Embraer responded by opening operations in Melbourne.

“We’ve hired quite a few people who were laid off,” Stangarone said. “The skill set needed to build aircraft is similar to that needed for aerospace.”

Labor considerations similarly brought Embraer to Jacksonville.

“The city has a great labor pool, not only for its aviation and tech workers, but also for its defense talent,” Stangarone said.

Also important, Embraer wanted a location near a port, so major assembly components such as tail sections and wings could be brought in.

Though Jacksonville has long been known as a place for aircraft maintenance and refurbishment, Embraer’s will be the first new aircraft assembly plant in Jacksonville, according to Michael Stewart, director of external affairs for the Jacksonville Aviation Authority.

That sends a message to other companies that Jacksonville might be a good place to build planes, JAA CEO and Executive Director Steve Grossman said. It was an advantage the city could offer to lease Embraer a hangar formerly used by Piedmont.

“The Air Force needed the planes delivered on a relatively short time schedule,” Grossman said. “Embraer didn’t have time to build a building.”

Embraer’s initial contract for 20 planes will create at least 50 jobs, Stangarone said. And there’s the possibility of future orders up to a maximum contract value of $950 million.

Grossman said just getting Embraer through the door has been a big win for the city.

“If you watch Embraer, wherever they go, they grow,” Grossman said. “And we hope their numbers here will grow. We hope they bring different business lines to Jacksonville.”

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10/01/2012 - Going Techno against Narcos

GOING TECHNO AGAINST NARCOS

Dominican Republic Strengthens Its Air and Sea Defenses Against Drug Traffickers

DIÁLOGO VOLUME 22 NO. 4 -- With its ability to deliver a combination of  rockets, missiles and bombs, the Brazilian-made Super Tucano has become the most feared guardian of the Dominican Republic’s airspace.  Visitors to San Isidro Air Base, located 25 kilometers east  of Santo Domingo, like to be photographed near the aircraft, and the civilian population expresses admiration when the sleek  turboprops cross the Caribbean sky during special demonstrations. The aircraft’s signature is the drawing of a voracious shark mouth on its pointed nose.

The Super Tucanos have been a key weapon in the fight against drug trafficking since they were delivered in 2010. Prior to that, illicit aircraft loaded with up to 600 kilograms of cocaine landed almost every day on roads accessing the country’s vast sugarcane fields and other clandestine airstrips, Major General Rolando Rosado Mateo of the Dominican Republic National Police and director of the National Drug Control Directorate (DNCD, for its Spanish acronym) told Diálogo.

Before 2010, approximately 90,000 kilograms of cocaine entered the Dominican Republic by air and about 45,000 kilograms by sea. The drug planes avoided Puerto Rico due to its advanced defense systems, Maj. Gen. Rosado said. That all changed when the Super Tucanos entered service. With the purchase of eight Super Tucanos by the government for more than $93 million, the number of illegal flights was reduced to practically zero by 2011.  

“When the air fleet became operational, illicit flights were completely eliminated; traffickers do not dare bring a plane to the Dominican Republic,” said Maj. Gen. Rosado. “If they enter our airspace, they will be at the hands of the Super Tucano aircraft.”

READ MORE [PDF]

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12/04/2012 - “An Awesome 21st Century Airplane”

“An Awesome 21st Century Airplane”

Air Commander for Operation Enduring Freedom Flies the A-29 Super Tucano

 

SPARKS, Nev., Dec. 4, 2012 – When Gen. Charles F. “Chuck” Wald emerged from a test flight in the A-29 Super Tucano his first comment was, “this is an awesome 21st Century airplane.” The retired four-star general and decorated combat pilot has a keen appreciation for how an aircraft handles.  Moreover, as one of the top military leaders responsible for planning and executing Operation Enduring Freedom and serving as Air Commander for the initial stages of the war, Gen. Wald knows what an aircraft like the A-29 Super Tucano would mean on the ground in Afghanistan.  

“I think if we’d had this in the inventory at the beginning of Afghanistan, it would have led the way for all the things we are doing there,” he said.  “It’s not for a high-threat environment, but Afghanistan isn’t. It’s for close air support and staying close to the target.  It has a lot of endurance.”  

Gen. Wald tried out the aircraft, a contender in the U.S. Air Force (USAF) Light Air Support (LAS) competition offered by Sierra Nevada Corporation in partnership with Embraer.  He compared the A-29 Super Tucano to an F-16 in terms of handling, capabilities, displays and navigation.  Where the similarities end, he said, was cost.  “This airplane doesn’t cost anything like an F-16 in terms of initial cost, fuel or maintenance. This is an affordable aircraft that gives you F-16-type delivery performance.”

The aircraft selected for the LAS program initially will be used to provide close air support, reconnaissance and training capabilities to the Afghanistan military.  As such, it is a critical element of the United States’ Afghan withdrawal strategy and central to maintaining security in that region going forward.  The LAS program also will provide the United States and other partner nations with critical capabilities for agile, flexible, economical, new generation multi-role airpower.  

The A-29 Super Tucano is a relatively small, sleek, and powerful turboprop aircraft capable of carrying out a wide range of missions, including close air support and intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance.  The aircraft is in use with seven air forces around the world and, for more than five years, has employed state-of-the-art munitions in real operational missions.  The aircraft is equipped with advanced electronic, electro-optic, infrared and laser system technologies, as well as secure radio systems with data links and unrivalled munitions capacity.  This makes it highly reliable and allows for an excellent cost-benefit ratio for a wide range of military missions, even operating from unpaved runways and in hostile environments.  These characteristics along with the fact that the aircraft has a proven combat record make it the leading contender for the LAS contract.  

During his test flight, Gen. Wald put the aircraft through its paces. “It handled beautifully,” he said.  “I didn’t have to worry about a lot of rudder. It powered up and came through the loop at 4Gs no sweat.  I didn’t have any problems going over the top.” 

In summary, Gen. Wald said:  “Easy to fly. Easy to maneuver. I think it’s perfect.”

Facts about the Embraer A-29 Super Tucano: 

  • A clean sheet design – built from the ground up for the light air support mission
  • A production aircraft – more than 180 ordered and more than 160 built and delivered
  • Operational today performing ISR and security missions around the globe
  • In use or on order with militaries in nine nations
  • More than 170,000 flight hours logged, including 26,000 combat hours; no combat losses
  • Certified for more than 130 munitions configurations
  • Features open-architecture avionics
  • Provides significant room for growth
  • Proven low operating costs – 84 percent fleet availability; 99 percent fleet mission effectiveness
  • Buy American Act compliant; 86 percent of the dollar value of the Super Tucano comes from components supplied by U.S. companies or countries that qualify under the Buy American Act
  • More than 100 U.S. companies in more than 20 states provide parts or services for the Super Tucano

 

About Sierra Nevada Corporation

Sierra Nevada Corporation (SNC) is one of America’s fastest growing private companies based on its significant expansion and reputation for rapid, innovative, and agile technology solutions in electronics, aerospace, avionics, space, propulsion, micro-satellite, aircraft, communications systems and solar energy. Under the leadership of CEO Fatih Ozmen and President Eren Ozmen, SNC employs over 2,300 people in 32 locations in 17 states. SNC’s six unique business areas are dedicated to providing leading-edge solutions to SNC’s dynamic customer base.

SNC is also the Top Woman-Owned Federal Contractor in the United States. Over the last 30 years under the Ozmen’s leadership, SNC has remained focused on providing its customers the very best in diversified technologies to meet their needs and has a strong and proven track record of success. The company continues to focus its growth on the commercial sector through internal advancements and outside acquisitions, including the emerging markets of renewable energy, telemedicine, nanotechnology, cyber and net-centric operations. For more information on SNC visit www.sncorp.com.

Media Contact: communicationsfromsnc@sncorp.com or Michelle Erlach at 775-849-6027

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11/29/2012 - Gov. Scott back in Brevard as Embraer breaks ground on new facility

Gov. Scott back in Brevard as Embraer breaks ground on new facility

by Wayne T. Price
FLORIDA TODAY
Nov. 29, 2012 

Gov. Rick Scott, in his second visit to Brevard County in as many days, was on hand to break ground for Embraer jet's Engineering and Technology Center USA.

"You can pick many companies, as successful as Embraer, to come to our state," Scott said this morning Prior to the employer groundbreaking at Melbourne International Airport.

The new 63,500-square-foot facility will employ at least 100 when it is fully operational.

"With these 200 new jobs, more families will be able to bring a paycheck home, and although our work isn't done, we'll continue to work to grow jobs so every Florida family can enjoy the American dream," Scott said.

This morning's event was attended by dozens of local lawmakers, economic development officials and other community supporters.

Read more here.

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10/2012 - Pilot Report: Embraer Super Tucano

Pilot Report: Embraer Super Tucano

by  MATT THURBER
AVIATION INTERNATIONAL NEWS -- OCTOBER 2012

For a journalist, the best part of attending the annual EAA AirVenture extravaganza in Oshkosh, Wis., is that often serendipity reigns, and the result is an entirely unexpected bonus, in this case the opportunity to fly Embraer’s EMB-314 Super Tucano light attack turboprop. Embraer arranged to fly the Super Tucano (Air Force designation A-29) to AirVenture to display it at the company’s booth, alongside its Phenom 100 and 300 business jets, and to highlight the company’s partnership with Sierra Nevada, program manager for the bid on the U.S. Air Force’s 20-airplane Light Air Support contract. 

READ MORE:    Download [PDF]

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09/07/2012 - CNBC: Need A Good Jobs Story? Try Florida's Space Coast

CNBC: Need A Good Jobs Story?
Try Florida's Space Coast

 

 

Published: Friday, 7 Sep 2012 | 2:46 PM ET
By: Brian A. Shactman, Jessica Golden

At the height of the space shuttle program, there were 18,000 people working at the Kennedy Space Center.

When it ended last summer, that number dropped by more than half almost immediately.

Conventional wisdom was that the surrounding communities would suffer severe economic hardship.

What CNBC learned from being on the ground there: It's not the case.

Unemployment ballooned to 11.7 percent last August, but since then, there's been an impressive infusion of positive energy — not to mention millions of investment dollars ... and jobs. 

Boeing, Embraer, SpaceX and Lockheed Martin are some of the companies that entered Brevard County to take advantage of Florida's business friendly environment and the Space Coast's highly skilled but under-utilized work force.

Embraer invested $50 million and established two facilities — a manufacturing plant and a showroom for their private jets.

"We narrowed it down to three states and six sites," said Gary Spulak, President of Embraer Aircraft Holdings. "The one here in Melbourne caught our eye because of the qualified workforces that is available here, especially with the retirement of the Space Shuttle program."

Yes, unemployment remains uncomfortably high, but it's down two whole points in a year.

Embraer added 230 jobs. Midair SA, which leases and trades aircraft, hired 450 people in the area. SpaceX won a NASA contract and CEO Elon Musk said he will hire up to 1,000 people in the next four to five years. NASA also tabbed Boeing, which plans to add 550 jobs between now and 2015. These are not fly-by-night companies.

READ MORE: cnbc.com.

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04/17/2012 - Dominican Republic Will Support Haiti with Super Tucano Fighters

Dominican Republic Will Support Haiti with Super Tucano Fighters 

Diálogo: The Dominican Republic will support Haiti with combat planes and patrol boats in the fight against drug trafficking, by President Leonel Fernández’s express order.  ...  The Dominican Republic’s cooperation with Haiti will include the fleet of Embraer A-29B Super Tucano light attack planes that the Dominican Air Force has been flying for over two years, as well as interceptor speedboats operated by the Dominican Navy.

Read more: dialogo-americas.com.

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03/27/2012 - CNBC: Embraer Creating Jobs in Florida

CNBC: EMBRAER CREATING JOBS IN FLORIDA

March 27, 2012

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03/23/2012 - Embraer To Add 200 High Paying Jobs In Melbourne

Embraer To Add 200 High Paying Jobs In Melbourne

March 23, 2012

While the investment in Super Tucano production is on hold -- for the moment -- in Jacksonville, Fla., Embraer North America continues to invest in the U.S. and hire more aerospace workers in Melbourne, Fla. 

Melbourne, FL  – Governor Rick Scott announced that Embraer, a Brazil-based aircraft manufacturer focused on commercial, defense, and executive aviation, is expanding its operations at Melbourne International Airport. The company will be adding a new research and development facility – The Embraer Engineering and Technology Center USA – and 200 new engineering jobs with average salaries of $70,000, in the near term. At least 40 new jobs are anticipated in 2012.

Read More Here.

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01/18/2012 - Air Force Report: A-29 Super Tucano

Air Force Report: A-29 Super Tucano

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02/21/2012 - Mayor Alvin Brown: We need military aircraft built here

Mayor Alvin Brown: We need military aircraft built here

by Alvin Brown, Mayor of Jacksonville, Fla.
Florida Times Union
February 21, 2012

Jacksonville has a long history of supporting the military and its national security role.
Jacksonville is a city of nearly a million people where one of every four residents is either on active duty, is serving in the reserves, or is a proud veteran.  We are honored to host a military/veteran population of nearly 250,000 people in the Jacksonville community.

From the start, my administration has made military issues a top priority...

When the United States Air Force announced its selection of the A-29 Super Tucano for its Light Air Support Program, I proclaimed it to be great economic news for the City of Jacksonville.

This state-of-the-art light air support aircraft will be built here, initially creating 50 high-wage jobs and representing millions in economic investment.

I was extremely proud that Embraer, the plane’s manufacturer as part of the Sierra Nevada Corp. team, had selected our city for this important effort.

This plane will play an integral role in completing our counterinsurgency mission in Afghanistan and in bringing our troops home safely and quickly…

Unfortunately, the investment that will happen here in Jacksonville is being held up by a lawsuit filed by the disqualified competitor for the Light Air Support contract. 

Read more here.

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01/11/2012 - New airframe adds strike capability to Afghan air force

New airframe adds strike capability to Afghan air force

January 11, 2012

AFGHANISTAN - In Afghanistan’s continued effort to independently battle counterinsurgency, a new tool will be added to their arsenal designed to allow versatility, reconnaissance and precision weapons placement to the growing Afghan air force.

Announced Dec. 30, the U.S. Air Force has approved a contract worth more than $350 million that will provide the Afghan air force with at least 20 A-29 Super Tucano light air support aircraft, ground training devices and all associated maintenance and support equipment originally slated to arrive mid-to-late 2013.

Shortly after a Nevada company had been given the green light to produce 20 manned spy planes for training pilots and fighting insurgents in Afghanistan, the Air Force halted work on the contract when a competitor protested the bid in Federal Claims Court.

Read more here.

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01/06/2012 - Strategy Page: Brazilian Wings Over Afghanistan

Strategy Page

Brazilian Wings Over Afghanistan

January 6, 2012

 

The U.S. Air Force is buying twenty Brazilian A-29 Super Tucano aircraft for the Afghanistan Air Force. The Super Tucano is a single engine turbo-prop trainer/attack aircraft that is used by over a dozen nations. This aircraft carries two internal 12.7mm (.50 caliber) machine-guns and carries 1.5 tons of bombs and rockets. It can stay in the air for 6.5 hours at a time. It is rugged, easy to maintain and cheap. The U.S. is paying $17.7 million for each Super Tucano, which includes training, spare parts and support equipment.

Read more here.

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01/05/2012 - UPI: Air Force suspends LAS work

UPI

Air Force suspends LAS work

WASHINGTON, Jan. 5 (UPI) -- The U.S. Air Force has suspended work on the LAS contract given to the Sierra Nevada Corp. and Embraer of Brazil because of pending litigation.

Kansas company Hawker Beechcraft, which was dropped from the $355 million competition, appealed its exclusion in a federal claims court last month and recently requested a temporary injunction be issued on the project.

Read more here.

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01/04/2012 - Second Line of Defense: The Super Tucano has won the LAS competition: Lingering Questions

Second Line of Defense

The Super Tucano has won the LAS competition: Lingering Questions

by Ed Timperlake 

Jan. 4, 2012

There is tremendous news for the American/NATO war effort in Afghanistan. With the selection of the Super Tucano, the Afghan Army Air Force can now begin to develop a combat capable air fleet for the Afghan Air Force.

Doing so is part of the process of reducing US and allied presence and having a key element for cooperation after the substantial ground forces of the US and its allies leave. This is a core task, not a peripheral one. This is not a procurement game; this is a capability and transition building block central to the future.

Read more here.

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01/03/2012 - AOL Defense: Air Force Buys Light Attack Planes For Afghans - Not U.S

AOL Defense

Air Force Buys Light Attack Planes For Afghans -- Not U.S.

By Sydney J. Freedberg Jr.

January 3, 2012

Just before the New Year, the U.S. Air Force finally selected a new Light Air Support plane for ground attack in counterinsurgency, picking the Brazilian Super Tucano over the American AT-6– whose manufacturer, Wichita, Kan.-based Hawker Beechcraft, is filing suit over the decision [update: leading the Air Force to issue a stop-work order on the 4th]. But just as important as what the Pentagon is buying is how many and for whom: just 20 aircraft, with an option for another 15, which will go not to equip regular U.S. Air Force units but to train the embryonic air force of Afghanistan.

Read more here.

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12/31/2011 - Florida Gov. Scott commends teamwork that resulted in Embraer contract $355 million aircraft manufacturing deal set to boost Jacksonville economy

Florida Gov. Scott commends teamwork that resulted in Embraer contract $355 million aircraft manufacturing deal set to boost Jacksonville economy

12/31/2011 Tallahassee, FL – On the heels of a $355 million aircraft manufacturing contract awarded by the U.S. Air Force to Jacksonville-based Embraer and partner companies, Governor Rick Scott commended the team effort by Lt. Gov. Jennifer Carroll, Senator Bill Nelson, Jacksonville Mayor Alvin Brown and other Florida officials, including members of the Florida Congressional Delegation, who all played key roles in landing the contract for Florida.

“This is an important deal for Florida’s economic future, and I’m particularly proud of Lt. Gov. Carroll’s leadership, alongside that of Senator Bill Nelson, Jacksonville Mayor Alvin Brown, and that of the Florida congressional delegation, all of whom worked hard on this deal for our state and community,” said Gov. Scott.  “The Lieutenant Governor personally testified before the U.S. International Trade Commission on behalf of Embraer, and her military aviation background and strong ties to the Jacksonville community played an important part in helping to seal this deal.”

Consistent with Gov. Scott’s plan to make Florida the number one state for doing business, Lt. Gov. Carroll has vigorously embraced her role as an economic ambassador for Florida. 

In addition to leading two trade missions, Lt. Governor Carroll appeared before the United States International Trade Commission in Washington D.C. on September 28th, 2011, to testify at the “Business Jet Aircraft Industry: Structure and Factors Affecting Competitiveness” hearing. The Lt. Governor appeared in support of Embraer, an aircraft manufacturer that has their North American headquarters in Melbourne Florida.

The full text of the Lt. Governor’s remarks before the commission can be viewed here (PDF).

Additionally, Lt. Governor Carroll penned an op-ed encouraging Floridians to contact their member of Congress in support of the Embraer deal, and as a former Navy Lieutenant Commander and aircraft maintenance officer, she also appeared in a video extolling the advantages of  Embraer’s A-29 Super Tucano for the light attack role sought by the United States Air Force.

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12/30/2011 - Mayor Brown Announces Embraer Airplane Contract

Mayor Brown Announces Embraer Airplane Contract

December 30, 2011  

Major Achievement Follows Visit to Brazil, Meeting with Air Force Secretary

Two months ago, Mayor Alvin Brown joined Governor Rick Scott on an economic development trip to Brazil, met with top executives from Brazilian aircraft manufacturer Embraer, and urged them to make Jacksonville a hub for their assembly of the Super Tucano light attack aircraft.

Just a few weeks ago, Mayor Brown traveled to Washington, met with U.S. Secretary of the Air Force Michael Donley, and advocated for Jacksonville. 

This afternoon, the U.S. Department of Defense announced that it awarded a $355 million contract to Sierra Nevada Corp. As part of that contract, Embraer will assemble Super Tacano planes for U.S. military use. Embraer has committed to assemble aircraft at Jacksonville International Airport. The project will initially create 50 high wage jobs and represents millions in economic investment.

“This is great economic news for Jacksonville,” said Mayor Brown. “The award reaffirms that Jacksonville is the most military and business friendly city in the United States.”

Mayor Brown credited the broad coalition of public and private sector partners which joined forces to make this achievement possible. “This announcement is yet another example of what we can accomplish when we work together,” said Mayor Brown. “Today’s success was a real team effort.”

Brown specifically mentioned the local efforts of the Jacksonville Aviation Authority, JAX Chamber, and JAX USA Partnership led by President Jerry Mallot. At the state level, he praised Governor Scott, Enterprise Florida, and Florida Chamber of Commerce President and CEO Mark Wilson as relentless advocates for this achievement. From a federal perspective, Brown praised the work of U.S. Senators Nelson and Rubio and U.S. Representatives Crenshaw, Brown, Mica, and Stearns to make this day possible.

Brown pledged to work closely with Embraer to make its aircraft assembly efforts a success. “I have developed a great working relationship with U.S. Embraer President Gary Spulak and his team, and look forward to our doing whatever the City can to be a good partner in this critical initiative for our armed forces and our economy.”

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07/2011 - Embraer Ranks in Top 100 “Best Companies to Wowk for” in Florida

EMBRAER RANKS IN TOP 100 “BEST COMPANIES TO WORK FOR” IN FLORIDA

Embraer in Florida has been recently recognized as one of the “Best Companies to Work for” by Florida Trend Magazine, ranking 28th in the Large Company Category.

Read the whole story here

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07/14/2011 - Mauritania Follows Indonesia's Recognition of A-29's Performance

Mauritania Follows Indonesia's Recognition of A-29's Performance

According to the same source, the drill is a "prelude to the acquisition by the Mauritanian air force of Brazilian Embraer EMB-314 Super Tucano aircraft, which are the best-performing model in this category".

Read the whole story here

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07/02/2011 - [Indonesian] Air Force to Get New Aircraft Next Year

[Indonesian] Air Force to Get New Aircraft Next Year

By Dicky Christanto, The Jakarta Post
July 2, 2011

Indonesian Air Force spokesman First Marshal Bambang Samoedro says the force will receive the first four Super Tocano aircraft in March next year as part of the realization of early plans to purchase a squadron of 16 Super Tocano warplanes. 

Read the whole story here

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06/01/2011 - Fla. Rep. Jimmy Patronis responds to Article's claims

Fla. Rep. Jimmy Patronis responds to Article's claims

June 1, 2011 

Florida Rep. Jimmy Patronis Responds to ALEC Claims (Page 1)

Read the whole letter to the American Legislative Exchange Council here

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05/26/2011 - Rep. Allen West Sends Letter To Air Force Secretary

Rep. Allen West Sends Letter To Air Force Secretary

May 26, 2011 

Rep. Allen B. West's Letter to Sec. Donley

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05/17/2011 - Is Hawker Beechcraft an American company?

Is Hawker Beechcraft an American company?

By Stephen Trimble
May 17, 2011 10:50 AM

The AT-6 may be an "American plane", but Hawker Beechcraft is not truly an American company. 

Hawker, of course, is a brand invented in the UK, which migrated across the Atlantic in the early 1980s when British Aerospace sold its business jet division to Beechcraft. That business was later acquired by Raytheon. Two decades later, the brand Hawker Beechcraft was invented when Raytheon sold the business to two investors -- Goldman Sachs and Toronto-based Onex. 

In fact, Hawker Beechcraft is at least a half-Canadian company, with half of its product line-up from the United Kingdom.

Read the whole story here

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05/16/2011 - “All Else is Rubbish”

“ALL ELSE IS RUBBISH”

By Ed Timperlake
May 16, 2011

There is a saying that can be recognized by all USAF, USN and USMC combat aviators that after engaging in a practice Air Combat Maneuvering (ACM) engagement — whomever ever first gets to the briefing board wins.

In other words, who ever first frames the debrief makes sure it favors the outcome desired-which is almost always 'I won.' There is absolutely nothing wrong with strong, capable, well-trained fearless egos doing what ever it takes in arguing tactics and technology to enhance their knowledge to fight and win in the air.

Read the whole story here

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05/07/2011 - Opinion: Fla. Job Growth Potential Harmed by Misinformation

Opinion: Fla. Job Growth Potential Harmed by Misinformation

by Mike Haridopolos
President, Florida State Senate
May 7, 2011

"Today, I want to call your attention to another important opportunity for Florida: Assembling aircraft for the U.S. Air Force's Light Air Support (LAS) mission in Afghanistan. Nevada-based Sierra Nevada Corporation and Brazil's Embraer are jointly bidding on this contract, and if they win, they will build their planes in Jacksonville, creating exactly the type of high-quality engineering and technical positions we so urgently need."

Read the whole story here

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05/04/2011 - Meeting the needs of the warfighter from the air

Meeting the needs of the warfighter from the air

By James H. Flatley, IV
05/04/11 

"Over the past four years much has been written, debated and proposed about the need for a light attack turboprop aircraft that’s ideally suited for irregular warfare in Afghanistan. Yet here we are four years later without a deployable solution."

Read the whole story here

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04/25/2011 - A-29 Super Tucano in Defense News

APRIL 25, 2011: A-29 SUPER TUCANO IN DEFENSE NEWS

Check out the A-29 Super Tucano in the April 25, 2011 issue of Defense News.

Low Cost. Highly Effective.

 

 

04/18/2011 - A-29 Super Tucano in Defense News

A-29 Super Tucano in Defense News

Check out the A-29 Super Tucano in the April 18, 2011 issue of Defense News.

 

Super Tucano in Defense News

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04/15/2011 - Members of Congress Write to Air Force

Members of Congress Write to Air Force

April 15, 2011 - Eighteen members of Congress teamed up to pen a letter to Air Force Secretary Michael B. Donley.

Congressional Delegation Letter to Secretary of the Air Force

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03/13/2011 - U.S. Eyes Super Tucano for SpecOps Work

U.S. Eyes Super Tucano for SpecOps Work

By Andrew Scutro
Defense News
03/13/11 

The U.S. Navy's new Irregular Warfare office has been looking at an agile Brazilian observation and ground-attack turboprop to provide an "organic" close air support aircraft for special operations forces. Under the classified "Imminent Fury" program, the Navy has already leased, tested and armed at least one Embraer EMB-314 Super Tucano, according to Capt. Mark Mullins, a naval special warfare officer serving as the deputy director of the Navy Irregular Warfare Office at the Pentagon.

Read the whole story here

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02/23/2010 - Modest Brazil warplane fitting into nations' plans

Modest Brazil warplane fitting into nations' plans

By Chris Kraul
The Los Angeles Times
02/23/10 

Several Latin American nations are buying the Super Tucano for use in anti-drug and counterinsurgency efforts. Even the U.S. and Britain are looking into the propeller-driven craft.

Read the whole story here